“Lima, so far from Peru”, by José Carlos Requena Peru


In Lima, the debate on the prison situation of former President Alberto Fujimori monopolizes the main spaces in the media and in the heated political debates. Outside the capital, a series of unresolved and challenging issues announce not so calm times. Follow @socie_ECpe

One of them is, without a doubt, the health impact caused by the rains and overflows of March and April. Apart from official figures, the sense of helplessness and vulnerability that concerns people affected by disasters makes the use of terms by the authorities an issue that requires special care. Having social sensitivity is important.

This week also the INEI released the figures of the evolution of poverty in the country. Although the information shows the significant reduction experienced between 2004 and 2016 (from 58.7% to 20.7%), in some regions there are still higher rates. Cajamarca and Huancavelica remain the poorest, ranging from 43.8% to 50.9%.

Rurality plays a significant role in the mountains. According to INEI, the poverty figure in this area reaches 47.8%, well above the national average.
Other relevant information was the study on corruption prepared by the Ombudsman’s Office. The report presents the cases of corruption that are being processed in the specialized attorney’s office, with the help of the Judiciary and the prosecution.
Of the approximately 33,000 cases reported nationwide, about one fifth (18.8%) corresponds to Lima, while the regions with the most cases are Áncash (8.4%) and Junín (6.9%).

This week there was also a disturbing information about the situation of Rolando Navarro, former executive president of the Forest Resources Supervision Agency (Osinfor), who reported receiving threats and has even applied for asylum outside the country. As Francesca García indicates, “Navarro was one of the most visible faces of one of the largest seizures of illegal wood produced in the country (valued at S / 1.6 million) in the framework of the Amazon operation” (El Comercio, 11 / 5/2017).

It is not minor information. Peru has 78.8 million hectares of natural forests. According to the FAO, considering the classification of soils by capacity of greater use of the land, “80.14% of the total national territory corresponds to lands suitable for forest production and protection lands”. With so much potential, the abandonment suffered by the sector, evident in the insecurity that overwhelms those who seek to preserve it, is clamorous.

Political actuality honors that phrase attributed to Alexander von Humboldt again: “Lima is closer to London than to Peru.”

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