Lesbian moms fighting to be legally recognized Peru

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At 00:25 a.m. on April 1, 2017, in an operating room where the doctors on duty listened to Luis Fonsi sing Despacito, Karenina Álvarez Johnson gave birth to Diego. Outside, in the corridors of the Samborjina clinic, Morayma Rejas nervously waited for the moment to finally have the newborn in his arms. “Is that my son?” She asked impatiently to the nurse who left the operating room with a small glue to her body. Yes, that was Diego, her baby, but the poor woman in white did not understand a celery and the face of nothing she put on made it evident.

Karenina and Morayma have been a couple for more than three years, wives for just over one and Diego’s mothers since they began to want him. Until a couple of weeks ago, before she developed a thrombosis that forced her to inject anticoagulants twice a day, Karenina was the one who breastfed the baby. Among other things, Morayma is that of the ‘piglets’.

Karenina and Morayma’s life could go by as normal for any woman who has become a mother, but that is a right that lesbian women like them are still not recognized in our country.

Cases like Karenina, Morayma and Diego are not few. Last January, Darling Yvone Delfín and Jenny Victoria Trujillo started a legal battle with Reniec, who does not recognize the relationship between them and their son Dakari. The little boy was born in August 2014 in Mexico City, where Darling and Jenny had legally married (Mexico, Colombia, Brazil, Uruguay and Argentina are the Latin American countries that have approved equal marriage).

The Migration Office of our country accepted his registration as a child of Peruvians born abroad and recorded as observation the names of the two mothers. However, Reniec has only accepted that the name of the biological mother goes in the ID of the child.

Read the full report this Saturday in the magazine We are from El Comercio.

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